Mount Whitney (14,505′) & Mount Muir (14,012′) via Discovery Ridge (Class-3 Scramble)

Mount Whitney is a 14,505-foot (4,421-meter) peak located in the Sierra Nevada of California. It is the highest peak in the continental United States, standing tall above its royal surroundings as a fantastic castle of pristine white granite. It was named after Josiah Whitney, the first leader of the California … Continue reading…

Mount Agassiz (13,893′) via West Slope (Class-3 Scramble)

Mount Agassiz is a 13,893-foot (4,235-meter) peak located in the Sierra Nevada of California. It anchors the west end of the infamous Palisades ridge, a chain of spectacular 4,000-meter peaks that comprises the most rugged alpine terrain in the state of California and also harbors the largest glacier in the … Continue reading…

Mount Tyndall (14,026′) via North Rib (Class-3 Mixed Scramble)

Mount Tyndall is a 14,026-foot (4,275-meter) peak located in the Sierra Nevada of California. It measures as the tenth-highest point in California. Although it is situated less than two miles west of its taller neighbor Mount Williamson, the east face of Mount Tyndall is a formidable sight: an arching wall … Continue reading…

Junction Peak (13,888′) via West Face (Class-3 Scramble)

Junction Peak is a 13,888-foot (4,233-meter) peak located in the Sierra Nevada of California. It earns its name from its position at the junction of the Kings-Kern Divide and the primary Sierra Crest. The roughly perpendicular confluence of these two subranges has produced pyramidal geometry that has subsequently been scoured … Continue reading…

Unicorn Peak (10,910′) & Cockscomb Peak (11,065′) via Unicorn-Cockscomb Traverse (Class-5 Scramble)

Unicorn Peak (10,910-feet) and Cockscomb Peak (11,065-feet) are two adjacent summits located in the Sierra Nevada of California. They are part of the majestic Cathedral Range, a chain of spectacular granite peaks generally known as the “high country” of Yosemite National Park. These two peaks are connected by a singular … Continue reading…

Mount Sneffels (14,150′) via Blaine Basin (Class-3 Scramble)

Mount Sneffels is a 14,150-foot (4,313-meter) mountain located in the San Juan Range of southwest Colorado. After Uncompahgre Peak, it is the second-highest point in the entire San Juan highlands. It is instantly distinguishable from all sides as a massive pyramid composed of fearsomely jagged volcanic rock. It is often … Continue reading…

Mount Hood (11,250′) via South Side Hogsback (Alpine Grade: AD-)

Mount Hood is a 11,250-foot (3,429-meter) active stratovolcano located in the Cascade Range of the northwestern United States. It is the highest point in the state of Oregon, located some 50 miles southeast of the city of Portland. It boasts a prominence of 7,700 vertical feet above the surrounding forested … Continue reading…

Mount Smuts (2,938-m) via South Ridge (Class-5 Scramble)

Mount Smuts is a 2,938-meter (9,639-foot) peak located in the Spray Range of the Canadian Rocky Mountains. It is a dramatic shark-tooth peak composed of near-vertical strata of the Palliser limestone formation. Situated directly on the Continental Divide (also the border of Alberta and British Columbia), Mount Smuts serves as a triple boundary point shared by … Continue reading…

Mount Lyell (13,114′) via Lyell Glacier (Class-4 Mixed Scramble)

Mount Lyell is 13,114-foot (3,997-meter) mountain located in the Sierra Nevada of California. Forming the southeastern edge of the Clark Range, it is the highest point in all of Yosemite National Park. It serves as a triple divide for the drainages of the Tuolumne River, the Merced River, and Rush Creek. The … Continue reading…

Mount Conness (12,590′) via East Ridge (Class-3 Scramble)

Mount Conness is a 12,590-foot mountain located in the Sierra Nevada of California. Guarded by sheer granite walls, its lofty pyramid is a dominating sight from all sides, boasting a tremendous view over Yosemite National Park. The Conness Glacier is harbored below its north face, feeding the multicolored Conness Lakes and the enchanting Saddlebag Lake … Continue reading…